Transparency reports

Transparency reports

Transparency what?

Certain government departments (like the GCSB) are able to request information from ISPs about their customers. This is an important crime-fighting tool. To protect citizen’s rights against illegal or unfair surveillance, ISPs can publish transparency reports that detail the information that the government is requesting.

Why we care

Because human rights should apply online. We believe that New Zealanders have a right to know who is accessing their data and under what authority. Law enforcement and national security are important. But these must be subject to the oversight that results from being open and transparent about these activities.

Because the Internet should be open. If too much user data was being accessed by government or law enforcement, then there would be a significant effect on the Internet’s utility, which would cease to be open.

Why should you care?

Transparency reports are the best tools available for you to evaluate if government and law enforcement agencies are using their power appropriately. ISPs should publicly publish annual reports that details all user data requests received from government, law enforcement or other agencies, as well as a summary of the data that the company provided in response.

Reports allow you to evaluate the truth of government claims that they only require special access to data in extreme cases. If requests for emails are in the dozens, you may have a different reaction to the same requests numbering into the 10,000s. Overseas, it is also common for providers to report the requests they refuse – a factor that may influence your choice of provider.

Do they tell you how often they give law enforcement customer information?

 
2degrees Not Achieved
2degrees does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Actrix Not Achieved
Actrix does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Bigpipe Not Achieved
Bigpipe does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Compass Not Achieved
Compass does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
DTS Not Achieved
DTS does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Farmside Not Achieved
Farmside does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Flip Not Achieved
Flip does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Inspire Not Achieved
Inspire does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
MyRepublic Not Achieved
MyRepublic does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Now Not Achieved
Now does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Orcon Not Achieved
Orcon does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information. But it does address the issue of requests for information from government agencies on its website (see the link below).
 
Skinny Broadband Not Achieved
Skinny Broadband does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Slingshot Not Achieved
Slingshot does not tell customers how many times government agencies request information from it. But it does set out its general approach on its website (see the link below).
 
Spark Not Achieved
Spark does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Trustpower Not Achieved
Trustpower does not publish how many times government agencies asks it for information.
 
Vodafone Not Achieved
Vodafone New Zealand does not publish how many times government agencies request information from it. However, Vodafone Global releases an annual law enforcement disclosure report (see link below). This report covers every country that Vodafone operates in. While the detail for New Zealand is insufficient to earn a tick here, Vodafone is the first ISP in NZ to start down the path towards transparency reporting.