Kiwis get better bang for buck with Internet and mobile services

18 May 2016

InternetNZ is very pleased to see consumers of broadband and mobile services getting better value for money.

Today, the Commerce Commission released its tenth annual telecommunications market monitoring report which shines light on the rapid change in the Internet market.

The report states that around 74% of households now have a fixed-line broadband connection and there are 5.8 million mobile devices - with nearly all phones selling with Internet connectivity.

InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter says it’s so important that New Zealanders have access to Internet services.

“Seeing the number of connected people rise is a wonderful thing and it's fantastic to see us doing so well as a country in regards to these stats.”

The report says the cost of Internet use has dropped over the last year with some plans including up to four times the data included at the same price points. 100GB and a fixed-line voice and broadband plan can now be bought for $65, $10 less than a year before. At the high end, a 100Mbps fibre voice and broadband plan with unlimited data costs $90 per month, 19% less than the equivalent in Australia.

“Having physical access to the Internet is not enough and there are many other factors that hinder people getting online. Affordability is a big factor that is creating a digital divide in New Zealand and this is why it's so great to see prices going down.

“It’s important that New Zealanders are getting value for money with these Internet based services so we can all take advantage of the vast opportunities the Internet holds,” says Carter.

While we are pleased to see Internet use increasing and the cost of it getting cheaper, the report does shine light on areas for improvement, in particular, telecommunications consumers reporting a high level of problems.

“This shows that the challenge of customer service remains. People want to know that dealing with their Internet provider will be simple, quick and right the first time.

“There's more work for the industry to do on that front,” says Carter.