jordanc's blog

Clarifying the .nz stewardship framework - a Memorandum of Understanding

Jordan CarterA blog post from Jordan Carter, Chief Executive of InternetNZ
2 May 2016

InternetNZ was founded in the 1990s with a purpose of being a voice for the Internet community. Under the global policy framework for the domain name system, individuals, organisations, or sometimes governments in each country, were given the job of running the local ccTLD in the interests of the local Internet community.

ICANN's journey to global control - a recap and update

Jordan CarterA blog post from Jordan Carter, Chief Executive of InternetNZ
18 April 2016

This post gives you a quick update on the progress of the accountability and global stewardship changes at ICANN, currently undergoing United States government consideration.

The juice on APRICOT

Jordan CarterA blog post from Jordan Carter, Chief Executive of InternetNZ
2 March 2016

ICANN accountability: a final hurdle looms

At ICANN's next open meetings (March in Marrakech), final community decisions about significant reform of the organisation's accountability arrangements are due. Ever since the United States agreed to the IANA Stewardship transition process back in 2014, accountability has been intertwined as a necessary step before the transition is signed off[1].

APRICOT 2016 - a few weeks away but still time for speaking submissions

JordanCarterA blog post from Jordan Carter, Chief Executive at InternetNZ
28 January 2015

APRICOT is a big, international technical conference aimed at people who operate the networks that make up the Internet we all know and love. APRICOT stands for Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies which is just a long way of saying technical content for network operators and having it spell a fruit.

Hopes for Dublin

As the 54th ICANN Meeting in Dublin approaches, CCWG-Accountability member and InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter sets out his hopes for the meeting, and his firm conviction that a path to consensus and speedy resolution of the accountability debate is open – and should be grabbed. 

It’s crunch time.

ICANN Accountability - the chronology and Dublin thoughts

This post shares a referenced chronology of recent accountability-related milestones in the ICANN environment, and offers some thoughts about the stakes at ICANN's Dublin meeting next week.

You’ve probably had an experience in your life of being part of a difficult or complicated project – sometimes things go into a blur, or after months or years you find it hard to remember the order of significant events.

ICANN Accountability and IANA Stewardship update

This is a brief update on the state of play of the two intertwined processes I’ve written about on and off over the past eighteen months: the IANA stewardship transition and the ICANN accountability improvement process.

On the transition…

The long-titled IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group (ICG) has pulled together the proposals from the three operational communities affected by the transition. Names, Numbers and Protocols have all set out how they see stewardship after the USA relinquishes its contract with ICANN.

Three key issues for ICANN's Accountability Working Group

In a separate post I’ve set out an update of what is at stake in the debate about the IANA stewardship transition and the ICANN accountability discussion. 

This post looks at three key topics that come up in the accountability debate, and our stance on them. I've participated in this working group since it was formed in December last year, so I do feel some attachment to its work. It's meeting face to face at the end of this week.


ICANN accountability, IANA stewardship - what's at stake?

ICANN. IANA. Accountability. Stewardship. Transition.

These words together have deep meaning to many of those who participate in or follow global Internet governance. They are also, to be honest, meaningless mumbo-jumbo the vast majority of Internet users.

What’s it all about, and should you care at all?

Annoyingly, the answer is, “probably.”

If you rely on the Internet’s Domain Name System functioning reliably (want that email to go to the right place? how about knowing your favourite website is going to work?) you should care.